The Crips (Gang) Part 2 There is a consensus amongst many well-known sociologists that gang warfare is only a precursor to the end-time civil wars with the same ridiculous ideologies of hate, greed, ignorance and loss.

Crip-on-Crip Rivalries

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The Crips became popular throughout southern Los Angeles as more youth gangs joined; at one point they outnumbered non-Crip gangs by 3 to 1, sparking disputes with non-Crip gangs, including the L.A. Brims, Athens Park Boys, the Bishops, The Drill Company, and the Denver Lanes. By 1971 the gang’s notoriety had spread across Los Angeles.

By 1971, a gang on Piru Street in Compton, California, known as the Piru Street Boys, was formed and associated themselves with the Crips as a set. After two years of peace, a feud began between the Piru Street Boys and the other Crip sets.

It would later turn violent as gang warfare ensued between former allies. This battle continued and by 1973, the Piru Street Boys wanted to end the violence and called a meeting with other gangs that were targeted by the Crips.

After a long discussion, the Pirus broke all connections to the Crips and started an organization that would later be called the Bloods, a street gang infamous for its rivalry with the Crips.

Since then, other conflicts and feuds were started between many of the remaining sets of the Crips gang. It is a popular misconception that Crips sets feud only with Bloods. In reality, they fight each other—for example, the Rolling 60s Neighborhood Crips and 83 Gangster Crips have been rivals since 1979.

In Watts, Los Angeles, the Grape Street Crips and the PJ Watts Crips have feuded so much that the PJ Watts Crips even teamed up with a local Blood set, the Bounty Hunter Bloods, to fight against the Grape Street Crips.

In the mid-1990s, the Hoover Crips rivalries and wars with other Crip gangs caused them to become independent and to refrain from using the Crip name, calling themselves the Hoover Criminals instead of Hoover Crips.

Alliances and rivalries
Rivalry with Bloods
The Bloods are the main rival of the Crips. The Bloods initially formed to provide members protection from the Crips. This rivalry started in the 1960s when Raymond Washington and other Crip members attacked Sylvester Scott and Benson Owens, two students at Centennial High School.

After the incident, Scott formed the Piru street-gang, while Owens established the West Piru street-gang. In late 1972, several gangs that felt victimized by the Crips due to their escalating attacks joined the Piru Street Boys to create a new federation of non-Crip gangs that would later become known as Bloods.

Between 1972 and 1979, the rivalry between the Crips and Bloods would grow, accounting for a majority of the gang-related murders in southern Los Angeles. Gang members of the Bloods and Crips occasionally fight against each other and are responsible for a significant portion of gang-related murders in Los Angeles.
Alliance with Folk Nation

In the late 1980s and early 1990s, as many Crip gang members were being sent to various prisons across the country, an alliance was formed between the Crips and the Folk Nation in Midwest and Southern U.S. prisons. This alliance was established as a means of protecting gang members incarcerated in state and federal prison systems.

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This alliance is strongest within the prisons, however, and is less effective on the outside. The alliance between the Crips and Folks is known as “8-ball”. A broken “8-ball” would indicate a disagreement or “beef” between Folks and Crips.wiki

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