“Listen to me good people- Money, is a means for the ‘Fair Trading Of Goods and Services’.”

image siurce

“Soon money will exhaust and
become worthless.”

So, the illuminati manipulate the. population and wealth of the world.What is left?

The illuminati. All who have the same greed and evils. Not a bad thing here, but a great revelation ….They will attack one another. “The word Elitist and status will be short lived.”

Illuminati – Elitist, You will be able to run with it for a short time, Only!

Is Love of Money Really the Root of All Evils?

Here’s the context of 1 Timothy 6:6–10.

Godliness with contentment is great gain, for we brought nothing into the world, and we cannot take anything out of the world. But if we have food and clothing, with these we will be content. But those who desire to be rich fall into temptation, into a snare, into many senseless and harmful desires that plunge people into ruin and destruction. For the love of money is the root of all evils. It is through this love of money that some have wandered away from the faith and pierced themselves with many pangs.

Notice that the first part of verse 10 (“For the love of money is a root of all evils”) functions as a ground, or a cause, both backward for verse 9 and forward for the rest of verse 10. Let’s take these one at a time.

How is verse 10a a ground for verse 9?
Verse 9 says that those who desire to be rich fall into “many senseless and harmful desires.” Notice that the desire to be rich does not produce just one desire, but many. Then Paul says the desire to be rich has this effect “because the love of money is the root of all evils.” The “desire to be rich” in verse 9 corresponds to “the love of money” in verse 10a. And the “many desires” of verse 9 corresponds to “all evils” in verse 10.

Paul is tracing the cause of these “many desires” back to the love of money as the root of “all evils.” Why does the desire to be rich not just result in one desire for money but “many desires”? Because the love of money is the root of vastly more than we usually think it is. It is the root of all evils that men do. Paul is tracing the multiplicity of desires that flow from the desire to be rich down deep to a root that accounts for “many” because it accounts for “all.”

“The love of money is the root of vastly more than we usually think it is.” Tweet Share on Facebook
How does the love of money do that? Here is one way: Because “money” is of no value in itself (the paper or the metal). It is desirable only because it is a cultural symbol which can be traded for the “many desires” that we have. But it cannot be traded for God or godliness. Therefore, the love of money in Paul’s mind corresponds to the root longing for the things money can buy minus God. That is why all these many desires “plunge people into ruin and destruction” (verse 9).

Good desires don’t destroy. Only desires for anything minus God destroy. That is what the love of money represents. Therefore, this love is the root of all evils that men commit. Because all evils come from that root desire — the desire for anything minus God. No exceptions.

This is the essence of sin and the root of all sinning — falling short of the glory of God (Romans 3:23). Or, to put it another way, sin is “exchanging God for the creation” (see Romans 1:23). In other words, at root, sin is preferring anything above God. “All evils” come from this preferring, or this desiring. If something is desired for God’s sake, that desire is not sin. If anything is desired not for God’s sake, that desire is sin. Therefore, all sin, “all evils,” come from this desire, this love — represented in 1 Timothy 6:10 by love for the currency of satisfaction minus God.

How is verse 10a related to the rest of verse 10?
Now we look in the other direction from verse 10a — forward to the rest of the verse. “For the love of money is a root of all evils. It is through this love of money that some have wandered away from the faith and pierced themselves with many pangs.”

Just as in verse 9 the “many senseless and harmful desires plunge people into ruin and destruction,” so here in verse 10 the love of money leads people to “pierce themselves with many pangs.”

“If you love money, you cannot serve God. And if you cannot serve God, then everything you do is evil.” Tweet Share on Facebook
How? “Through this love of money some have wandered away from the faith.” The love of money works its destruction by luring the soul to forsake faith. Faith is the contented trust in Christ that Paul referred to in verse 6: “Godliness with contentment is great gain.” Faith says, “I have learned in whatever situation I am to be content” (Philippians 4:11). Faith has contentment in all circumstances because it has Christ, and Christ makes up for every loss: “I count everything as loss because of the surpassing worth of knowing Christ Jesus my Lord” (Philippians 3:8).

All true virtue grows from this root of resting in Christ. Without it, we perform our deeds not as an expression of Christ’s all-sufficiency, but in order to make up for some deficiency we feel, for lack of faith. But that is not true virtue, and it doesn’t honor Christ. Only what is done from faith is truly virtuous. Thus Paul wrote, “For whatever does not proceed from faith is sin” (Romans 14:23).

Which means, “all evils” — to use the words of 1 Timothy 6:10 — rise from the soul that has been lured away from faith. And that, Paul says, is what the love of money does. Through this love of money “some have wandered away from the faith.” But “without faith it is impossible to please God” (Hebrews 11:6). Only evil comes from faithlessness — all evil.

You Can’t Love God and Money
So, whether we focus on the way 1 Timothy 6:10a relates backward to verse 9, or forward to the rest of verse 10, the conclusion is the same: It is not nonsense to speak of the love of money being the root of all evils. Changing this in translation to “all kinds of evil” is unnecessary (and when you think about it, “all kinds” is probably just as problematic as “all evils”).

Perhaps the simplest way to illustrate this is to quote Jesus when he said,

“No one can serve two masters, for either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to the one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and money.” (Matthew 6:24)

Jesus uses the term “love” to describe the choice: We either love God, or we love money. He attaches the idea of “serving” to this idea of loving: “You cannot serve God and money.” From this I infer that, if you love money, you cannot serve God. And if you cannot serve God, then everything you do is evil. Because that is what evil is: any act not done out of loving service to God. Therefore, the love of money is the root of all evils, not just some evils.

Perhaps you are not persuaded that I have seen a plausible meaning in 1 Timothy 6:10 for the words, “The love of money is the root of all evils.” If not, I hope you have at least seen that someone given more insight than I surely might see such a meaning. Therefore, translators should not preempt that effort by presuming to know such a meaning did not exist

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